Ballerinas, Edgar Degas, part III.

(Source: marieantoinete, via ablogwithaview)

4,457 notes

paxvictoriana:

ALWAYS RELEVANT: NOT-VICTORIAN WOMEN OF ALL ERAS, COLORS

alcottgrimsley:

medievalpoc:

beggars-opera:

I’ve seen a few fashion posts trying to expand the “Marie Antoinette is not Victorian” rant, but this stuff can get complicated, so here is a semi-comprehensive list so everyone knows exactly when all of these eras were.

Please note that this is very basic and that there are sometimes subcategories (especially in the 17th century, Jacobean, Restoration, etc)

And people wonder WHY I complain about History/Art History periodization. Note how much overlap there is to the above “eras”, and how many exceptions and extensions there are to these categories.

Oh, and by the way…

Tudor:

image

Elizabethan:

image

Stuart:

image

Georgian:

image

Regency:

image

Victorian:

image

Edwardian:

image

Because you wouldn’t want to be historically inaccurate.

I reblogged this post before but OHHHH extra reference that’s so hard to get anywhere on Google or books

80,009 notes

1 note

(Source: soul-frosts, via lostwithmargaret)

6,699 notes

"Beyond myself, somewhere, I wait for my arrival."

Octavio Paz (via tierradentro)

(via tierradentro)

432 notes

(Source: artisnonsense, via debourbon)

80 notes


Alfred de Breanski, Jr.(1877 - 1957)

Alfred de Breanski, Jr.
(1877 - 1957)

(Source: art-and-dream, via septemberwildflowers)

465 notes

lindahall:

Elizabeth Gould - Scientist of the Day

Elizabeth Gould, an English artist, was born July 18, 1804. In 1829, she married John Gould, an up-and-coming ornithologist, and Elizabeth immediately became the official family draughtswoman, finishing John’s rough drawings and executing the lithographs for the Century of Birds from the Himalaya Mountains (1830-32), and The Birds of Europe (1833-37). Although John gave Elizabeth full artistic credit in the Century, he became increasingly reluctant to share the limelight in later publications, so that, for example, Elizabeth receives almost no acknowledgement in the bird volume of Darwin’s Zoology of the Beagle (1841), although she did all the drawings and lithographs.

Elizabeth went to Australia with John in 1838 (leaving her 3 youngest children behind) and spent two years there, capturing the local birds and mammals on paper. John and Elizabeth returned to England in 1840, but sadly, Elizabeth died of puerperal fever in 1841, after giving birth to their eighth child. She was only 37 years old. All of her Australian paintings were lithographed and eventually published in such volumes as The Mammals of Australia (1863), but she received no credit at all for these posthumous publications.

The images show the crimson horned pheasant from Century of Birds, the blue roller from Birds of Europe, and the cactus finch from the Zoology of the Beagle,as well as a portrait of Elizabeth in a private collection.

Elizabeth was one of 12 women artists featured in the Library’s 2005 exhibition, Women’s Work. All of the volumes mentioned here are in the Library’s History of Science Collection.

Dr. William B. Ashworth, Jr., Consultant for the History of Science, Linda Hall Library and Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Missouri-Kansas City

(Source: lhldigital.lindahall.org, via heaveninawildflower)

536 notes

lonequixote:

  Detail of Vincent van Gogh's signature (Vase with Twelve Sunflowers)

lonequixote:

  Detail of Vincent van Gogh's signature (Vase with Twelve Sunflowers)

(via tierradentro)

1,938 notes

amare-habeo:

Albert Marquet  (French, 1875-1947) - Le Pont Neuf sous la Pluie, N/D

amare-habeo:

Albert Marquet  (French, 1875-1947) - Le Pont Neuf sous la Pluie, N/D

(via ablogwithaview)

230 notes